Ash Trees

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Ash Trees

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Product Description

Ash Trees for Sale Online, Mill Farm Plants Ash Trees

Not available due to ash dieback disease

Common ash is found across Europe. It is currently being affected by Chalara dieback of ash, a disease caused by the Hymenoscyphus fraxineus fungus.

Scientific name: Fraxinus excelsior Family: Oleaceae

Ash trees can live to a grand old age of 400 years – even longer if coppiced.

When fully grown, ash trees can grow to a height of 35m. Tall and graceful, they often grow together, forming a domed canopy. Easily identified in winter by smooth twigs that have distinctively black, velvety leaf buds arranged opposite each other.

Leaves: pinnately compound, comprising 6-12 opposite pairs of light green, oval leaflets with long tips, up to 40cm long. There is an additional singular ‘terminal’ leaflet at the end. The leaves can move in the direction of sunlight.

Flowers: ash is dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers typically grow on different trees, although a single tree can also have male and female flowers on different branches. Both male and female flowers are purple and appear before the leaves in spring, growing in spiked clusters at the tips of twigs.

Fruits: once the female flowers have been pollinated by wind, they develop into conspicuous winged fruits, in late summer and autumn.

Ash trees will grow in most soil types, although they prefer low land chalk or limestone. Ash prefers damp conditions and needs lots of light. Prepare a hole deep enough in which to plant your tree, leaving approximately one foot of extra depth for potting soil and approximately twice as wide as the root ball. Choose a spacious area as this tree will grow to very large proportions. This tree grows very quickly and deep watering will enable its roots to penetrate deeply into the soil.

For additional information on planting and caring for Ash tree plants see our page on planting tips, pruning and after care advice

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